No major host genetic risk factor contributed to A(H1N1)2009 influenza severity

Koldo Garcia-Etxebarria, María Alma Bracho, Juan Carlos Galán, Tomàs Pumarola, Jesús Castilla, Raúl Ortiz De Lejarazu, Mario Rodríguez-Dominguez, Inés Quintela, Núria Bonet, Marc Garcia-Garcerà, Angela Domínguez, Fernando González-Candelas, Francesc Calafell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 Garcia-Etxebarria et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. While most patients affected by the influenza A(H1N1) pandemic experienced mild symptoms, a small fraction required hospitalization, often without concomitant factors that could explain such a severe course. We hypothesize that host genetic factors could contribute to aggravate the disease. To test this hypothesis, we compared the allele frequencies of 547,296 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between 49 severe and 107 mild confirmed influenza A cases, as well as against a general population sample of 549 individuals. When comparing severe vs. mild influenza A cases, only one SNP was close to the conventional p = 5×10-8. This SNP, rs28454025, sits in an intron of the GSK233 gene, which is involved in a neural development, but seems not to have any connections with immunological or inflammatory functions. Indirectly, a previous association reported with CD55 was replicated. Although sample sizes are low, we show that the statistical power in our design was sufficient to detect highly-penetrant, quasi-Mendelian genetic factors. Hence, and assuming that rs28454025 is likely to be a false positive, no major genetic factor was detected that could explain poor influenza A course.
Original languageEnglish
Article number0135983
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Sep 2015

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