Net ecosystem exchange and whole plant isoprenoid emissions by a mediterranean shrubland exposed to experimental climate change

J. Llusià, J. Penuelas, P. Prieto, M. Estiarte

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    Abstract

    We tested the effect of forecasted soil drought and warming climate conditions for the next decades on emission rates of isoprenoids by mediterranean shrublands. We measured isoprenoid emissions by whole dominant mediterranean woody plants (Erica multiflora L. and Globularia alypum L.) inhabiting the studied shrublands. Monoterpene emissions were detected in both species, but isoprene was emitted only by E. multiflora. Maximum emission rates were found during the hottest periods (except for G. alypum, in which they occurred in autumn), and minimum emission rates in winter in E. multiflora. Terpene emission rates ranged from 0.08 μg/(g dry wt h) in winter in E. multiflora to 8.8 μg/(g dry wt h) in G. alypum in autumn. In E. multiflora, the terpene emission rates decreased in response to soil drought only in summer, but increased in response to warming in spring and autumn. Isoprene emissions ranged from 0.1 μg/(g dry wt h) in spring to 4.4 μg/(g dry wt h) in summer. The effect of the treatments was only detected in autumn when soil drought and warming had a negative effect on isoprene emission rates. These data might improve our knowledge of isoprenoid emissions at the canopy level and in response to climate change, soil drought, or warming. © 2008 MAIK Nauka.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)29-37
    JournalRussian Journal of Plant Physiology
    Volume56
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2009

    Keywords

    • Climate change
    • Emission rate
    • Erica multiflora
    • Globularia alypum
    • Isoprenoids
    • Soil drought
    • Terpenes
    • Warming

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