Native vertebral osteomyelitis in aged patients: distinctive features. An observational cohort study

Juan Aguilar-Company, Carles Pigrau, Nuria Fernández-Hidalgo, Dolors Rodríguez-Pardo, Vicenç Falcó, Mayli Lung, Ferran Pellisé, Benito Almirante

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Purpose: To describe the demographic, clinical, and microbiological profile of native vertebral osteomyelitis (NVO) in aged patients as compared to that of younger patients, to identify differences that could motivate changes in clinical management. Methods: Retrospective, observational cohort study (1990–2015) including all adult patients with microbiologically confirmed NVO divided into 2 groups: aged (≥ 65 years) vs younger (18–64 years). Results: 247 patients included, 138 aged and 109 younger. Relative to younger patients, the aged had higher rates of healthcare-related infection (40.6 vs 25.7%, p = 0.014), previous known heart valve disease (29.7 vs 9.2%, p < 0.001), and concomitant infective endocarditis (38.4 vs 20.2%, p = 0.002). The groups showed similar rates of symptomatic spinal cord compression (14.5 vs 11.9%, p = 0.556) and paraspinal abscesses (62.3 vs 68.8%, p = 0.288) at presentation. There was a trend to lower spine surgery rates in the aged (11.6 vs 17.4%, p = 0.192). On univariate analysis, Staphylococcus aureus infection was associated with higher in-hospital mortality in aged (29%, OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.61–11.45). In-hospital mortality was higher among the aged (14.5 vs 6.4%, p = 0.044) as well as relapse rate due to treatment failure (3.4 vs 1%, p = 0.377). Conclusions: The findings underscore the importance of preventing healthcare-related infection and maintaining high clinical suspicion of infective endocarditis in aged NVO patients to implement proper management. S. aureus infection had a poorer prognosis in this population. As compared to younger patients, spinal surgery rates were slightly lower and overall prognosis poorer in the aged, despite similar rates of symptomatic spinal cord compression and abscesses at presentation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)679-686
JournalInfection
Volume46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Bone infections
  • Healthcare-related infection
  • Infective endocarditis
  • Native vertebral osteomyelitis

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    Aguilar-Company, J., Pigrau, C., Fernández-Hidalgo, N., Rodríguez-Pardo, D., Falcó, V., Lung, M., Pellisé, F., & Almirante, B. (2018). Native vertebral osteomyelitis in aged patients: distinctive features. An observational cohort study. Infection, 46, 679-686. https://doi.org/10.1007/s15010-018-1177-6