Myocardial Injury After Noncardiac Surgery: Incidence, Predictive Factors, and Outcome in High-Risk Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery: An Observational Study

Anna González-Tallada, Jaume Borrell-Vega, Carolina Coronado, Paula Morales, Marcos de Miguel, Ignacio Ferreira-González, Miriam de Nadal

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2019 Elsevier Inc. Objective: The authors aimed to evaluate the incidence of myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery (MINS), its relationship with perioperative variables, and its prognostic implications for 30-day mortality in high-risk thoracic surgery patients. Design: Observational study including cardiovascular high-risk patients undergoing routine postoperative troponin monitoring during the first 2 postoperative days. MINS was diagnosed based on at least 1 troponin I determination ≥0.04 ng/mL with no evidence of a nonischemic etiology. Setting: Tertiary university hospital. Participants: Adult patients with cardiac risk factors, defined as patients ≥65 years old or patients <65 years old with known cardiovascular pathology (history of cardiac, cerebral, or peripheral vascular pathology) who underwent elective thoracic surgery. Measurement and Main Results: Forty-eight patients (27.3%) (95% confidence interval [CI] 20.8%-34.5%) of 177 had diagnostic criteria for MINS. On univariate analysis, an association was found between MINS and smoking (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, 95% CI 1.26-3.76), lobectomy (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.66), pneumonectomy (OR 6.72, 95% CI 1.35-33.9), use of vasoactive drugs (OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.03-3.65), and pericardial incision (OR 6.72, 95% CI 1.35-33.9). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, only smoker status and type of surgery were independent risk factors for MINS. No association was found between MINS and 30-day mortality. Conclusions: Based on the findings, the elevated incidence of MINS after thoracic surgery, the independent relationship with the extent of lung resection, and the fact that MINS was not associated with greater mortality suggest that nonischemic causes may contribute to troponin elevation after thoracic surgeries.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • lobectomy
  • myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery
  • pneumonectomy
  • thoracic surgery
  • troponin

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