Estudio multicentrico de variabilidad e idoneidad de la prescripcion antibiotica en la neumonia adquirida en la comunidad del adulto

Translated title of the contribution: Multicenter study of the variability and adequacy of antimicrobial therapy for community-acquired pneumonia in adults

A. Artero*, J. M. Eiros, C. Ochoa, L. Inglada, L. Guerra, L. Armadans, A. Vallano, J. B. Vidal, A. Martinez, A. Lazaro, T. Cerda, A. Ruiz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We performed a study to evaluate the variability and adequacy of prescribing antibiotics in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in 10 Spanish hospitals. We studied 452 patients with CAP. Initial empirical administration of antibiotics was prescribed in 90.7% of the cases, 82.5% as monotherapy. Macrolides and third and second generation cephalosporins were the most widely used groups of antibiotics. Penicillin and amoxicillin were only prescribed in 1.7% of the patients. A significant variability between hospitals was observed. Reference patterns for the use of antibiotics in CAP were devised by a panel of experts. According to the recommendations of this panel, 29% of the total prescriptions were not adequate, with this percentage reaching 65% in outpatients older than 65 years or with comorbidity. This was mainly due to the fact that monotherapy with erythromycin, which was considered inadequate, was the most widely prescribed treatment.

Translated title of the contributionMulticenter study of the variability and adequacy of antimicrobial therapy for community-acquired pneumonia in adults
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)352-358
Number of pages7
JournalRevista Espanola de Quimioterapia
Volume12
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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