Migrant and Non-Migrant Origin Pre-Service Teachers' Beliefs about Multilingualism and Teaching in Multilingual Classrooms: Convergences and Divergences

Júlia Llompart, Marilisa Birello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reports findings from an investigation into migrant and non-migrant origin pre-service teachers' beliefs about multilingualism and the relationship between their linguistic trajectories as students and how they perceive themselves as future teachers. We analize the beliefs of around seventy pre-service teachers taking part in a university course, collected through an individual reflection tool based on a SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) and a group discussion in which students had to discuss their ideas and create a collective document. In this article we focus on the discourse of four pre-service teachers, two of whom had migration backgrounds and two of whom who did not. Findings suggest that pre-service teachers' life and learning experiences contribute to different emotions and feeling about language and teaching in a multilingual setting. They also influence the perception the pre-service teachers have of themselves as future teachers. Pre-service teachers regard the preparation received at the university negatively and express insecurities. Findings illustrate that migrant origin pre-service teachers feel more prepared in the sense they believe that their migration experience can help to understand newcoming students and be empathic with them.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-123
Number of pages22
JournalSustainable Multilingualism
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • educational and linguistic trajectories
  • initial teacher training
  • language ideologies
  • migrant origin teachers
  • teachers' beliefs

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