Metabotropic glutamate receptors activate phospholipase D in astrocytes through a protein kinase C-dependent and Rho-independent pathway

Joan Marc Servitja, Roser Masgrau, Raul Pardo, Elisabet Sarri, Christoph Von Eichel-Streiber, J. Silvio Gutkind, Fernando Picatoste

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G protein-coupled receptors that mediate phospholipase D (PLD) activation in brain, but the mechanism underlying this response remains unclear. Here we used primary cultures of astrocytes as a cell model to explore the mechanism that links mGluRs to PLD. Glutamate activated both phospholipase C (PLC) and PLD with equal potency and this effect was mimicked by L-cysteinesulfinic acid, a putative neurotransmitter previously shown to activate mGluRs coupled to PLD, but not PLC, in adult brain. PLD activation by glutamate was dependent on Ca2+ mobilization and fully blocked by both protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors and PKC down-regulation, suggesting that PLD activation is secondary to PLC stimulation. Furthermore, brefeldin A, an inhibitor of ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) activation, partially inhibited the activation of PLD by glutamate. By contrast, pretreatment of astrocytes with Clostridium difficile toxin B, which inactivates small G proteins of the Rho family (Rho, Rac, and Cdc42), had no effect on PLD stimulation by glutamate. Taken together, these results indicate that PLD activation by mGluRs in astrocytes is dependent on PKC and small G proteins of the ARF family, but does not require Rho proteins. © 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-180
JournalNeuropharmacology
Volume44
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2003

Keywords

  • Arf
  • Astrocytes
  • Glutamate
  • Phospholipase C
  • Phospholipase D
  • Protein kinase C
  • Rho

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