Local communities’ perceptions of wild edible plant and mushroom change: A systematic review

Christoph Schunko*, Xiaoyue Li, Benjamin Klappoth, Francesca Lesi, Vincent Porcher, Anna Porcuna-Ferrer, Victoria Reyes-García

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of wild edible plants and mushrooms can help to counteract the homogenisation of diets and decreasing resilience of food systems. We performed a systematic review to consolidate information about perceptions of wild edible plant and mushroom changes from the perspective of local communities. We found that 92% of all perceived changes of wild edibles relate to their decreased abundance. 76% of the wild edibles with perceived decreased abundance are fruits and vegetables and 23% crop wild relatives. The main drivers of decreased abundance are perceived to be land use change (38% of all taxa) and direct exploitation (31%). These changes have potential negative implications on food systems from local to global scales.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100601
Number of pages8
JournalGlobal Food Security
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2022

Keywords

  • Dietary diversity
  • Indigenous and local knowledge
  • Neglected and underutilized species
  • Non-timber forest product
  • Wild food
  • Wild plant gathering

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