Lipid oxidation in fresh and spray-dried eggs enriched with ω3 and ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids during storage as affected by dietary vitamin E and canthaxanthin supplementation

J. Galobart, A. C. Barroeta, M. D. Baucells, F. Guardiola

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66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment was planned to study the influence of dietary fat source (linseed oil or sunflower oil) and dietary doses of α-tocopheryl acetate (α-TA) (0 or 200 mg/kg of feed) and canthaxanthin (CX) (0 or 5 mg/kg of feed) on fatty acid (FA) composition and lipid oxidation of fresh and spray-dried eggs. Dietary supplementation with α-TA and CX modified the levels of certain long-chain polyunsaturated FA (PUFA). Lipid oxidation in fresh eggs and spray-dried eggs at 0, 6, and 12 mo of storage was measured by the lipid hydroperoxide (LHP) and TBA values. The LHP and TBA values were up to 10 times higher in spray-dried eggs than in fresh eggs. The evolution of LHP and TBA values in spray-dried eggs showed that ω3 FA-enriched eggs were more susceptible to lipid oxidation than those enriched with ω6 FA. The α-TA supplementation increased the lipid stability of enriched eggs and was very effective throughout the storage of spray-dried eggs. On the other hand, CX supplementation did not prevent lipid oxidation in PUFA-enriched eggs. Moreover, no synergistic effect between both compounds was detected.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)327-337
JournalPoultry Science
Volume80
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2001

Keywords

  • Dietary canthaxanthin
  • Dietary α-tocopherol
  • Lipid oxidation
  • Spray-dried egg
  • ω3 and ω6 fatty acid-enriched eggs

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