Labour incorporation of young Southern European graduates in Mexico: the impact of the economic crisis

Cristóbal Mendoza, Anna Ortiz, Xavier Oliveras

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

Abstract

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. The 2008 economic crisis has had particularly negative effects on the youth labour market outcomes in Southern Europe. Thus, it is hardly surprising that many Southern European youngsters see migration as the only way to escape from under-employment and precariousness. In this context, the article studies the reasons for emigration to Mexico of a group of young graduates from Italy and Spain. The paper is based on 42 in-depth semi-structured interviews with young graduates, aged 29 years old or less on their arrival in Mexico. The article first explores the relevance of the economic crisis as the main reason behind the migration of this group. It is revealed that the interviewed graduates had a precarious labour incorporation back in their countries of origin, and migration appeared as a means to further their careers. Second, the paper analyses the interviewees’ labour incorporation in Mexico; in many cases this coincides with an extended university-work transition, since many of them had not secured full-time permanent jobs before their arrival in Mexico. Finally, the paper explores the interviewees’ future plans. These depend not only on their work experiences in Mexico but also on their degree of social and cultural integration in the host country.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)-
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Youth Studies
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jul 2019

Keywords

  • ACCULTURATION
  • EMIGRATION
  • EXPERIENCES
  • IMMIGRANTS
  • International migration
  • MIGRANTS
  • MOBILITY
  • Mexico
  • SENSE
  • SKILLED MIGRATION
  • STUDENTS
  • Southern Europe
  • TRANSITION
  • economic crisis
  • labour incorporation
  • young graduates

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Labour incorporation of young Southern European graduates in Mexico: the impact of the economic crisis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this