Kennel dogs as sentinels of Leishmania infantum, Toxoplasma gondii, and Neospora caninum in Majorca Island, Spain

Oscar Cabezón, Javier Millán, Margalida Gomis, Jitender P. Dubey, Ezio Ferroglio, Sonia Almería

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Kennel dogs can serve as sentinels and/or reservoirs of diseases of veterinary and zoonotic interest because they have often roamed free and lived outdoors, thus being exposed to pathogens. We tested dogs from the kennel of Inca (Majorca/Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Spain) for evidence of infection with three protozoan parasites: Leishmania infantum, Toxoplasma gondii, and Neospora caninum. Exposure to L. infantum was found in 56.3% of 48 dogs (37.5% by Western blot, 43.8% by PCR). Only 30% of infected dogs had leishmaniosis-like lesions. Seroprevalence to T. gondii was 58.7% of 46 dogs using the modified agglutination test (MAT, titer 1:25). None of the 44 dogs tested had N. caninum antibodies using a commercial competitive ELISA, probably because the surveyed dogs did not roam in the proximity of cattle farms. Results confirm the endemicity of L. infantum and also the widespread presence of T. gondii in the Mediterranean island of Majorca. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1505-1508
JournalParasitology Research
Volume107
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2010

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