Invasive device-associated infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in critically ill patients: evolution over 10 years

F. Álvarez-Lerma, P. Olaechea-Astigarraga, M. Palomar-Martínez, M. Catalan, X. Nuvials, R. Gimeno, M. P. Gracia-Arnillas, I. Seijas-Betolaza

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society Invasive device-associated infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa over 10 years (2007–2016) were assessed based on data from the ENVIN-HELICS registry (200 Spanish intensive care units). P. aeruginosa was the leading pathogen except in the last two years in which there was a slight decrease, with Escherichia coli as the leading aetiology. The rate of infections caused by P. aeruginosa remained between 12.0% and 14.6% throughout the study period. There was a significant increase of isolates resistant to imipenem, meropenem, ceftazidime, cefepime, and piperacillin–tazobactam. Multidrug-resistant and the sum of extensively drug- and pandrug-resistant strains also increased. Resistance to anti-pseudomonal antimicrobials remains a matter of concern.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e204-e208
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume100
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Anti-pseudomonal drugs
  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Critically ill
  • Intensive care unit
  • Invasive device-associated infection
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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