Introduction: Biocultural diversity and the participation of local communities in national and global conservation

Claudia Camacho-Benavides, Luciana Porter-Bolland, Isabel Ruiz-Mallén, Susannah R. McCandless

Research output: Chapter in BookChapterResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York. All rights are reserved. Much of the world's biodiversity is found in areas of human settlement, where people are highly dependent on natural resources for their subsistence. In 1995, more than one billion people were living in 25 biodiversity hotspots of priority for conservation. However, the global tendency has been for official biodiversity conservation measures (i.e., protected areas) to often exclude communities from decision-making or consider their participation and presence as detrimental. Some authors follow this conventional approach, supporting the strict protection of areas important for biodiversity and ecosystem services against people's intervention. In contrast, other authors argue that rural and indigenous communities have developed a cumulative body of local ecological knowledge, beliefs, and practices important for biodiversity conservation and sustainable use of natural resources.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCommunity Action for Conservation: Mexican Experiences
Pages1-10
Number of pages9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2013

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