Introducing medical students to medical informatics

J. J. SANCHO, J. C. GONZÁLEZ, A. PATAK, F. SANZ, A. SITGES‐SERRA

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary. Medical informatics (MI) has been introduced to medical students in several countries. Before outlining a course plan it was necessary to conduct a survey on students' computer literacy. A questionnaire was designed for students, focusing on knowledge and previous computer experience. The questions reproduced a similar questionnaire submitted to medical students from North Carolina University in Chapel Hill (NCU). From the results it is clear that although almost 80% of students used computers, less than 30% used general purpose applications, and utilization of computer‐aided search of databases or use in the laboratory was exceptional. Men reported more computer experience than women in each area investigated by our questionnaire but this did not appear to be related to academic performance, age or course. Our main objectives when planning an MI course were to give students a general overview of the medical applications of computers and instruct them in the use of computers in future medical practice. As our medical school uses both Apple Macintosh and IBM compatibles, we decided to provide students with basic knowledge of both. The programme was structured with a mix of theoretico‐practical lectures and personalized practical sessions in the computer laboratory. As well as providing a basic overview of medical informatics, the course and computer laboratory were intended to encourage other areas of medicine to incorporate the computer into their teaching programmes. 1993 Blackwell Publishing
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)479-483
JournalMedical Education
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1993

Keywords

  • *education, medical, undergraduate
  • *medical informatics
  • questionnaires
  • Spain

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