Intracranial self-stimulation facilitates memory consolidation, but not retrieval: its effects are more effective than increased training

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Abstract

To evaluate possible differential effects of lateral hypothalamic intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) on memory consolidation and retrieval, independent groups of Wistar rats were trained in a single session of two-way active avoidance task (acquisition session) and tested 24 h later (retention session). The post-ICSS groups received an ICSS treatment immediately after the acquisition session, and the pre-ICSS groups received the same treatment immediately before the retention session. Because the ICSS effects on memory seem to be dependent on the initial performance level shown by the subjects, the possible influence of initial training (number of trials) on ICSS effects was also studied. Therefore, we used different control and experimental groups, which received either 30 or 50 trials in the acquisition session. Post-training ICSS facilitated the 24-h retention in both training conditions (30 and 50 trials). In contrast, pre-retention ICSS treatment did not facilitate performance in the retention test. We also observed that post-training ICSS was more effective for improving the 24-h retention than increasing the initial training from 30 to 50 trials. This findings confirm that ICSS treatment improves memory consolidation and suggest that it might not affect memory retrieval mechanisms. Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-75
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume129
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2002

Keywords

  • Intracranial self-stimulation
  • Memory consolidation
  • Memory facilitation
  • Memory retrieval
  • Two-way active avoidance

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