Integrative approaches to the study of animal management practices during the Neolithic of South Iberian Peninsula: the case of El Toro cave (Antequera, Málaga, Spain)

Vanessa Navarrete*, Alejandro Sierra, Roger Alcàntara, Maria Dolores Camalich, Dimas Martín-Socas, Maria Saña

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The introduction and adoption of livestock played a pivotal role in shaping subsistence strategies of populations in the southern Iberian Peninsula during the Neolithic. However, there is lack of information regarding animal management strategies, such as grazing areas and changes in foddering strategies, and their correlation with the environmental characteristics, type of site and use of the settlement. The study of feeding strategies of domesticates provides a crucial information about the interaction between the management of the environment, husbandry systems and the exploitation of animal products. In this study, we use the archaeozoological data and the δ13C and δ15N stable isotope composition of the faunal bone collagen to understand herding systems and management strategies during the Neolithic in Phases IV and IIIB at El Toro cave (Antequera, Málaga). Archaeozoological and isotopic results revealed diverse husbandry practices and feeding strategies in El Toro cave during the Neolithic. The variability in δ13C and δ15N values suggests the access of domesticates to different grazing areas and foddering strategies. This study contributes new insights into husbandry practices during the Neolithic and opens new perspectives for analysing animal management in mountain areas.

Original languageEnglish
Article number21
Number of pages16
JournalArchaeological and Anthropological Sciences
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Archaeozoology
  • Bulk collagen
  • Foddering strategies
  • Husbandry practices
  • δC and δN stable isotopes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Integrative approaches to the study of animal management practices during the Neolithic of South Iberian Peninsula: the case of El Toro cave (Antequera, Málaga, Spain)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this