Inhibition of catecholamine synthesis depresses behavior of rats in the holeboard and forced swim tests: Influence of previous chronic stress

M. Gil, J. Marti, A. Armario

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    21 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Cathecholaminergic pathways in the brain are activated during stress and are presumably involved in the control of physiological and behavioral changes triggered by stress. When repeatedly stressed, adaptive changes have been observed in catecholaminergic activity in the brain. In the present experiment, it was assessed whether or not chronic exposure to immobilization (IMO) altered the influence of catecholamines on behavior in the holeboard and forced swim test by administering α-methyl-p-tyrosine (an inhibitor of catecholamine synthesis). Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Chronic stress amortiguated the inhibitory effect of acute IMO on some but not all behaviors in the two tests. Whereas previous chronic IMO exacerbated the effects of the drug on struggling and immobility in the forced swim test, no change in response to the drug as a consequence of chronic IMO was observed in the holeboard test. The present data suggest that chronic IMO-induced changes in the catecholaminergic control of some behaviors might be related to depression-like states in rats. The actual physiological meaning of these changes and the specific receptors involved remain to be elucidated. © 1992.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)597-601
    JournalPharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior
    Volume43
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1992

    Keywords

    • Adaptation
    • Catecholamines
    • Chronic stress
    • Forced swim test
    • Holeboard
    • Immobilization
    • α-Methyl-p-tyrosine

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