Information and communication technologies for approaching smokers: A descriptive study in primary healthcare Health behavior, health promotion and society

Elisa Puigdomènech, Jose Manuel Trujillo-Gómez, Carlos Martín-Cantera, Laura Díaz-Gete, Mónica Manzano-Montero, Jessica Sánchez-Fondevila, Yolanda Gonzalez-Fernandez, Beatriz Garcia-Rueda, Elena Mercedes Briones-Carrió, M. Lourdes Clemente-Jiménez, Carmen Castaño, Joan Birulés-Muntané

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 Puigdomènech et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: Common interventions for smoking cessation are based on medical advice and pharmacological aid. Information and communication technologies may be helpful as interventions by themselves or as complementary tools to quit smoking. The objective of the study was to determine the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the smoking population attended in primary care, and describe the major factors associated with its use. Methods: Descriptive observational study in 84 health centres in Cataluña, Aragon and Salamanca. We included by simple random sampling 1725 primary healthcare smokers (any amount of tobacco) aged 18-85. Through personal interview professionals collected Socio-demographic data and variables related with tobacco consumption and ICTs use were collected through face to face interviews Factors associated with the use of ICTs were analyzed by logistic regression. Results: Users of at least one ICT were predominantly male, young (18-45 years), from most favoured social classes and of higher education. Compared with non-ICTs users, users declared lower consumption of tobacco, younger onset age, and lower nicotine dependence. The percentages of use of email, text messages and web pages were 65.3%, 74.0% and 71.5%, respectively. Factors associated with the use of ICTs were age, social class, educational level and nicotine dependence level. The factor most closely associated with the use of all three ICTs was age; mainly individuals aged 18-24. Conclusions: The use of ICTs to quit smoking is promising, with the technology of mobile phones having a broader potential. Younger and more educated subjects are good targets for ICTs interventions on smoking cessation.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Feb 2015

Keywords

  • Information and communication technologies
  • Primary health care
  • Smoking cessation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Information and communication technologies for approaching smokers: A descriptive study in primary healthcare Health behavior, health promotion and society'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this