Influence of hepatitis C virus infection on HIV-1 disease progression and response to highly active antiretroviral therapy

Jürgen K. Rockstroh, Amanda Mocroft, Vincent Soriano, Cristina Tural, Marcello H. Losso, Andrzej Horban, Ole Kirk, Andrew Phillips, Bruno Ledergerber, Jens Lundgren

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    331 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective. To assess hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody prevalence in the EuroSIDA cohort, along with survival, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 disease progression, virologic response (plasma HIV-1 RNA load of <500 copies/mL), and CD4 cell count recovery by HCV serostatus in patients initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Results. HCV serostatus at or before enrollment was available for 5957 patients; 1960 (33%) and 3997 (67%) were HCV seropositive and seronegative, respectively. No association between an increased incidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining illnesses or death and HCV serostatus was seen after adjustment for other prognostic risk factors known at baseline (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.97 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.81-1.16]). However, there was a large increase in the incidence of liver disease-related deaths in HCV-seropositive patients in adjusted models (IRR, 11.71 [95% CI, 6.42-21.34]). Among 2260 patients of known HCV serostatus initiating HAART, after adjustment, there was no significant difference between HCV-seropositive and -seronegative patients with respect to virologic response (relative hazard [RH], 1.13 [95% CI, 0.84-1.51]) and immunologic response, whether measured as a ≥50% increase (RH, 0.94 [95% CI, 0.77-1.16]) or a ≥50 cells/μL increase (RH, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.77-1.11]) in CD4 cell count after HAART initiation. Conclusions. HCV serostatus did not affect the risk of HIV-1 disease progression, but the risk of liver disease-related deaths was markedly increased in HCV-seropositive patients. The overall virologic and immunologic responses to HAART were not affected by HCV serostatus. © 2005 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)992-1002
    JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
    Volume192
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 Sep 2005

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