Individual versus group cognitive-behavioral treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder: A controlled pilot study

Nuria Jaurrieta, Susana Jimenez-Murcia, José Manuel Menchón, M. Del Pino Alonso, Cinto Segalas, Eva Álvarez-Moya, Javier Labad, Roser Granero, Julio Vallejo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study sought to examine the effectiveness of group and individual cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) and to compare the results with those of a wait-list control group among a sample of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Fifty-seven individuals diagnosed with OCD were evaluated pre- and posttreatment with the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and the Hamilton Rating Scales for Anxiety and Depression. Both group and individual CBT obtained statistically significant reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms. Patients in individual treatment achieved a statistically significant reduction in OCD symptoms compared with those in group treatment, but their dropout rate was twice as high. Patients with symmetry and order rituals presented less improvement in anxiety symptoms than those with other rituals. Associated general symptoms were lower in patients receiving either mode of CBT compared with wait-list participants. The authors found that individual treatment is more effective in reducing obsessive-compulsive symptoms than group treatment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)604-614
JournalPsychotherapy Research
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Sep 2008

Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavioral treatment
  • Control study
  • Effectiveness
  • Group condition
  • Individual condition

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