In vivo molecular responses of fast and slow muscle fibers to Lipopolysaccharide in a Teleost fish, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Leonardo J. Magnoni, Nerea Roher, Diego Crespo, Aleksei Krasnov, Josep V. Planas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. The physiological consequences of the activation of the immune system in skeletal muscle in fish are not completely understood. To study the consequences of the activation of the immune system by bacterial pathogens on skeletal muscle function, we administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an active component of Gram-negative bacteria, in rainbow trout and performed transcriptomic and proteomic analyses in skeletal muscle. We examined changes in gene expression in fast and slow skeletal muscle in rainbow trout at 24 and 72 h after LPS treatment (8 mg/kg) by microarray analysis. At the transcriptional level, we observed important changes in metabolic, mitochondrial and structural genes in fast and slow skeletal muscle. In slow skeletal muscle, LPS caused marked changes in the expression of genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, while in fast skeletal muscle LPS administration caused major changes in the expression of genes coding for glycolytic enzymes. We also evaluated the effects of LPS administration on the fast skeletal muscle proteome and identified 14 proteins that were differentially induced in LPS-treated trout, primarily corresponding to glycolytic enzymes. Our results evidence a robust and tissue-specific response of skeletal muscle to an acute inflammatory challenge, affecting energy utilization and possibly growth in rainbow trout.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-87
JournalBiology
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Feb 2015

Keywords

  • Fish
  • Lipopolysaccharide
  • Muscle
  • Proteome
  • Transcriptome

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