In vitro preformed biofilms of bacillus safensis inhibit the adhesion and subsequent development of listeria monocytogenes on stainless‐steel surfaces

Anne Sophie Hascoët, Carolina Ripolles‐avila, Brayan R.H. Cervantes‐Huamán, José Juan Rodríguez‐jerez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Listeria monocytogenes continues to be one of the most important public health challenges for the meat sector. Many attempts have been made to establish the most efficient cleaning and disinfection protocols, but there is still the need for the sector to develop plans with different lines of action. In this regard, an interesting strategy could be based on the control of this type of foodborne pathogen through the resident microbiota naturally established on the surfaces. A potential inhibitor, Bacillus safensis, was found in a previous study that screened the interaction between the resident microbiota and L. monocytogenes in an Iberian pig processing plant. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of preformed biofilms of Bacillus safensis on the adhesion and implantation of 22 strains of L. monocytogenes. Mature preformed B. safensis biofilms can inhibit adhesion and the biofilm formation of multiple L. monocytogenes strains, eliminating the pathogen by a currently unidentified mechanism. Due to the non‐enterotoxigenic properties of B. safensis, its presence on certain meat industry surfaces should be favored and it could represent a new way to fight against the persistence of L. monocytogenes in accordance with other bacterial inhibitors and hygiene operations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number475
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalBiomolecules
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Bacillus safensis
  • Biofilms
  • Listeria monocytogenes
  • Microbiota
  • Pathogen inhibition
  • Surfaces

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