Improved survival among ICU-hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia by unidentified organisms: a multicenter case–control study

J. Rello, E. Diaz, R. Mañez, J. Sole-Violan, J. Valles, L. Vidaur, R. Zaragoza, S. Gattarello, B. Alvarez, L. Alvarez, J. Blanquer, Ma Blasco, M. Borges-Sa, E. Bouza, E. Bunsow, M. Catalan, E. Diaz, J. Garnacho, D. Koulenti, T. LisboaD. Lopez, Mj Lopez-Pueyo, F. Lucena, P. Luque, R. Mañez, A. Martin, J. Pereira, J. Rello, R. Jorda, R. Sebastian, R. Sierra, J. Sole-Violan, B. Suberviola, A. Torres, J. Valles, L. Vidaur, R. Zaragoza

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. A retrospective analysis from prospectively collected data was conducted in intensive care units (ICUs) at 33 hospitals in Europe comparing the trend in ICU survival among adults with severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to unknown organisms from 2000 to 2015. The secondary objective was to establish whether changes in antibiotic policies were associated with different outcomes. ICU mortality decreased (p = 0.02) from 26.9 % in the first study period (2000–2002) to 15.7 % in the second period (2008–2015). Demographic data and clinical severity at admission were comparable between groups, except for age over 65 years and incidence of cardiomyopathy. Over time, patients received higher rates of combination therapy (94.3 vs. 77.2 %; p < 0.01) and early (<3 h) antibiotic delivery (72.9 vs. 50.3 %; p < 0.01); likewise, the 2008–2015 group was more likely to receive adequate antibiotic prescription [as defined by the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society (IDSA/ATS) guidelines] than the 2000–2002 group (70.7 vs. 48.2 %; p < 0.01). Multivariate analysis showed an independent association between decreased ICU mortality and early (<3 h) antibiotic administration [odds ratio (OR) 3.48 [1.70–7.15], p < 0.01] or adequate antibiotic prescription according to guidelines (OR 2.22 [1.11–4.43], p = 0.02). In conclusion, our findings suggest that ICU mortality in severe CAP due to unidentified organisms has decreased in the last 15 years. Several changes in management and better compliance with guidelines over time were associated with increased survival.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-130
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

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