Impact of prompt catheter withdrawal and adequate antimicrobial therapy on the prognosis of hospital-acquired parenteral nutrition catheter-related bacteraemia

D. Rodríguez-Pardo, B. Almirante, N. Fernández-Hidalgo, C. Pigrau, C. Ferrer, A. M. Planes, R. Alcaraz, R. Burgos, A. Pahissa

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Catheter-related bacteraemia (CRB) is a cause of death in hospitalized patients, and parenteral nutrition (PN) is a risk factor. We aim to describe the prognosis of PN-CRB and the impact of catheter extraction within 48 h from bacteraemia. All consecutive hospitalized adult patients with CRB (2007-2012) were prospectively enrolled. Factors associated with 30-day mortality were determined by logistic regression analysis. Among 847 episodes of CRB identified, 291 (34%) episodes were associated with short-term catheter use for PN. Cure was achieved in 236 (81%) episodes, 42 (14.5%) patients died within the first 30 days, 7 (2.5%) relapsed, and 6 (2%) had re-infection. On multivariate analysis, previous immunosuppressive therapy (OR 5.62; 95% CI 1.69-18.68; p 0.0048) and patient age (OR 1.05; 95% CI 1.02-1.07; p 0.0009) were predictors of 30-day mortality, whereas catheter removal within 48 h of bacteraemia onset (OR 0.26; 95% CI 0.12-0.58; p 0.0010) and adequate empirical antibiotic treatment (OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.17-0.77; p 0.0081) were protective factors. Incidence of PN-CRB decreased from 5.36 episodes/1000 days of PN in 2007 to 2.9 in 2012, yielding a 46.1% rate reduction (95% CI 15.7-65.5%), which may be attributable to implementation of a multifaceted prevention strategy. In conclusion, short-term PN-CRB accounted for one-third of all episodes of CRB in our setting, and 14.5% of patients died within 30 days following bacteraemia. Our findings suggest that prompt catheter removal and adequate empirical antibiotic treatment could be protective factors for 30-day mortality. Concomitantly with implementation of a multifaceted prevention strategy, PN-CRB incidence was reduced by half.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1205-1210
JournalClinical Microbiology and Infection
Volume20
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2014

Keywords

  • Catheter-related bacteraemia
  • Epidemiology
  • Outcome
  • Parenteral nutrition
  • Prevention

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