Identification of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome via newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency. Two years’ experience in Catalonia (Spain)

Andrea Martin-Nalda*, Anna M. Cueto-González, Ana Argudo-Ramírez, Jose L. Marin-Soria, Monica Martinez-Gallo, Roger Colobran, Albert Plaja, Neus Castells, Jacques Riviere, Eduardo F. Tizzano, Pere Soler-Palacin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The current scenario of newborn screening is changing as DNA studies are being included in the programs of several countries. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) disorders can be detected using quantitative PCR assays to measure T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs), a byproduct of correct T-cell development. However, in addition to SCID, other T-cell-deficient phenotypes such as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome 22q11.2 duplication syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, and trisomy 21 are detected. Methods: We present our experience with the detection of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and 22q11.2 duplication syndrome in a series of 103,903 newborns included in the newborn screening program of Catalonia (Spain). Results: Thirty newborns tested were positive (low TREC levels) and five were found to have copy number variations at the 22q11 region (4 deletions and 1 duplication) when investigated with array comparative genomic hybridization technology and MLPA. Conclusion: Newborn screening for SCID enables detection of several conditions, such as 22q syndromes, which should be managed by prompt, proactive approaches with adequate counseling for families by a multidisciplinary team.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1016
JournalMolecular Genetics and Genomic Medicine
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • 22q11.2 deletion
  • newborn screening
  • severe combined immunodeficiencye

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