Hyperaccumulation of trace elements: From uptake and tolerance mechanisms to litter decomposition; selenium as an example

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Abstract

Abstract: Hyperaccumulation of trace elements by plants is an attractive field of research with potential applications in phytoremediation of contaminated soils, biofortification of food with essential nutrients, and biofuel production. For these purposes, selenium is of special interest because areas with Se-deficient soils frequently are close to seleniferous soils. The use of Se-hyperaccumulating species for phytoremediation of soils with high Se burdens requires basic knowledge on the mechanisms of uptake, transport and tolerance of Se in plants. However, also a better understanding of the rhizosphere processes governing Se cycling is essential. Quinn et al. in this issue of Plant and Soil address, for the first time, the question of specialist decomposers presence and role in leaf litter from selenium hyperaccumulating plants in a seleniferous habitat. Their experimental results strongly support the involvement of selenium tolerant decomposers. This knowledge is of crucial importance for putting into practice integrated management systems for biofortification and phytoremediation technologies. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-35
JournalPlant and Soil
Volume341
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Hyperaccumulation
  • Litter decomposition
  • Selenium
  • Soil microbe diversity
  • Trace elements

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