How do persons with apraxia of speech deal with morphological stress in Spanish? A preliminary study

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Abstract

© 2019, © 2019 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Equal stress across adjacent syllables and extended syllable durations are amongst the most salient features of acquired Apraxia of Speech (AOS). Most studies conclude that there is a deficit in durational cue processing, whereas the other acoustic stress correlates remain relatively unimpaired. Spanish is a free-stress language in which stress patterns are contrastive, especially in verbal forms (e.g. lavo /ˈlabo/ ‘[I] wash’ vs lavó /laˈbo/ ‘[He/she] washed’). The aim of this preliminary study is to determine whether persons with AOS are able to make the intended stress pattern identifiable and, if so, to determine which acoustic cues they use to avoid the ‘equal stress’ phenomenon. The results show that, for each parameter considered (duration, intensity, fundamental frequency), apraxic participants’ productions differed from those of controls to varying degrees depending on the task. However, 91.7% of the apraxic participants’ realisations were perceived as corresponding to the intended tense and person. These results are interpreted as deriving from a motoric deficit affecting morphological stress processing by subjects with AOS combined with an idiosyncratic compensatory use of the stress cues in order to avoid ‘equal stress’.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-168
Number of pages38
JournalClinical Linguistics and Phonetics
Volume34
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2019

Keywords

  • ACOUSTIC DATA
  • APHASIA
  • Apraxia of speech
  • CUES
  • IMPAIRMENT
  • LEFT-HEMISPHERE
  • LEXICAL STRESS
  • LINGUISTIC PROSODY
  • PROSODIC DISTURBANCE
  • RETRIEVAL
  • Spanish
  • VOWEL
  • acoustics
  • compensation
  • equal stress
  • morphological stress

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