High V<inf>cmax</inf>, J<inf>max</inf> and photosynthetic rates of Sonoran Desert species: Using nitrogen and specific leaf area traits as predictors in biochemical models

César Hinojo-Hinojo, Alejandro E. Castellanos, Jose Llano-Sotelo, Josep Peñuelas, Rodrigo Vargas, Jose R. Romo-Leon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2018 Elsevier Ltd Dryland ecosystems largely control the inter-annual variability of the global carbon cycle. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of data on key biochemical parameters, such as maximum carboxylation velocity (Vcmax25) and electron transport rate (Jmax25), from species in these ecosystems which limits our capacity to model photosynthesis across ecological scales. We studied six dominant C3 shrub and tree species from the Sonoran Desert with different leaf traits and phenological strategies. We characterized Vcmax25 and Jmax25 for each species and assessed which traits or trait combinations were the best predictors of these parameters for biochemical models of photosynthesis. All species had high values of Vcmax25 and Jmax25, mostly explained by high leaf nitrogen content (Narea) and high nitrogen allocation to photosynthetic enzymes comparable to those reported for herbs and crop species but higher than those of shrubs and other functional types in world databases. We found that the high values of Vcmax25 and Jmax25, by increasing rates of photosynthetic reactions, enhance photosynthetic water and nitrogen-use efficiencies and may favor carbon gain under typical conditions in drylands. Our findings improve the parameterization of photosynthesis models, and provide novel implications to common findings of high Narea in dryland species.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-8
    JournalJournal of Arid Environments
    Volume156
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

    Keywords

    • Dryland species
    • J max
    • Leaf nitrogen content
    • Leaf traits
    • Photosynthesis biochemical models
    • V cmax

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'High V<inf>cmax</inf>, J<inf>max</inf> and photosynthetic rates of Sonoran Desert species: Using nitrogen and specific leaf area traits as predictors in biochemical models'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this