High levels of dietary unsaturated fat decrease α-tocopherol content of whole body, liver, and plasma of chickens without variations in intestinal apparent absorption

C. Villaverde, M. D. Baucells, E. G. Manzanilla, A. C. Barroeta

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Abstract

An experiment was designed to assess the effect of dietary unsaturated fat inclusion level on αtocopherol apparent absorption and deposition in broiler chickens at 2 ages (20 and 39 d). The dietary fat was a mixture of linseed and fish oil, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The experimental treatments were the result of 4 levels of supplementation with a-tocopheryl acetate (0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg; E0, E100, E200, and E400 treatments, respectively) and 4 dietary oil inclusion levels (2, 4, 6, and 8%; 02, 04, 06, and 08 treatments respectively). Almond husk was used as an energy dilutor in the high-fat diets. Apparent absorption of total fatty acids was high in all treatments averaging 88% and was higher with high fat dietary inclusion level. a-Tocopheryl acetate hydrolysis and apparent absorption of a-tocopherol were similar in both ages and were not affected by fat inclusion level, except for a reduction of the absorption in the low-fat diet (O2) in the E100 treatment at 20 d of age. Despite this lack of differences in hydrolysis and absorption, higher-fat PUFA diets induced lower concentrations of free a-tocopherol in the excreta, at high atocopherol doses, suggesting an increase in the destruction of ̧-tocopherol by lipid oxidation in the gastrointestinal tract. Similarly, total and hepatic α-tocopherol deposition was lower in the birds fed high-PUFA diets in the E200- and E400-supplemented birds, possibly due to a destruction of vitamin E when protecting these PUFA from lipid peroxidation. α-Tocopherol concentration in liver and, to a lesser extent, in plasma was a useful indicator of the degree of response of this vitamin to different factors that can affect its bioavailability; however, in the present experiment, CV were too high to use liver and plasma concentrations as estimators of total body vitamin E. © 2008 Poultry Science Association Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)497-505
JournalPoultry Science
Volume87
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2008

Keywords

  • Chicken
  • Fat
  • Unsaturated
  • Vitamin E

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