Geological Heritage Beyond Natural Spaces: The Red Rocks Amphitheatre (Morrison, CO, USA), an Example of Syncretism Between Urban Development and Geoconservation

Jordi Carreras, Elena Druguet, Christine S. Siddoway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Colorado, USA constitutes a paradigm for reconciling contemporary human actions and geological heritage conservation. The Amphitheatre, built upon red beds of the east flank of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, was constructed in the late 1930s with close attention to and respect for the existing geological landform. The park surrounding the performance space is incorporated in the Mountains Park System together with the adjoining Dinosaur Ridge/Morrison Fossil Area National Natural Landmark. Together, the Red Rocks Park and the Dinosaur Ridge provide access to an informative geological cross-section that exemplifies the geology of the Rocky Mountains, from the Precambrian crystalline basement to and across the Phanerozoic cover. Park visitors and concert goers may explore or encounter the transect along walks that are marked by geology information panels. The situation of the Amphitheatre performance space within the geological transect provides a powerful example of the coexistence of different values and multiple uses that may increase the heritage of the site. Settings like this that educate and increase civic awareness of locations of geological value are potentially positive for geoconservation. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-212
JournalGeoheritage
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2012

Keywords

  • Geological heritage
  • Integrated management
  • Landscape architecture
  • Natural amphitheatre
  • Protected areas

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