Genetic variations in the VEGF pathway as prognostic factors in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy

L. Paré-Brunet, A. Sebio, J. Salazar, A. Berenguer-Llergo, E. Rió, A. Barnadas, M. Baiget, D. Paéz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved. Angiogenesis is a significant biological mechanism in the progression and metastasis of solid tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), its receptors and signaling effectors have a central role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Genetic variation in the VEGF pathway may impact on tumor angiogenesis and, hence, on clinical cancer outcomes. This study evaluates the influence of common genetic variations within the VEGF pathway in the clinical outcomes of 172 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with first-line oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. A total of 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 16 genes in the VEGF-dependent angionenesis process were genotyped using a dynamic array on the BioMark™ system. After assessing the KRAS mutational status, we found that four SNPs located in three genes (KISS1, KRAS and VEGFR2) were associated with progression-free survival. Five SNPs in three genes (ITGAV, KRAS and VEGFR2) correlated with overall survival. The gene-gene interactions identified in the survival tree analysis support the importance of VEGFR2 rs2071559 and KISS1 rs71745629 in modulating these outcomes. This study provides evidence that functional germline polymorphisms in the VEGF pathway may help to predict outcome in mCRC patients who undergo oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-404
JournalPharmacogenomics Journal
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Oct 2015

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