Genetic and Clinical Factors Associated with Chronic Postsurgical Pain after Hernia Repair, Hysterectomy, and Thoracotomy: A Two-year Multicenter Cohort Study

Antonio Montes, Gisela Roca, Sergi Sabate, Jose Ignacio Lao, Arcadi Navarro, Jordi Cantillo, Jaume Canet

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    80 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2015, the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc. Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Background: Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) has been linked to many surgical settings. The authors aimed to analyze functional genetic polymorphisms and clinical factors that might identify CPSP risk after inguinal hernia repair, hysterectomy, and thoracotomy. Methods: This prospective multicenter cohort study enrolled 2,929 patients scheduled for inguinal hernia repair, hysterectomy (vaginal or abdominal), or thoracotomy. The main outcome was the incidence of CPSP confirmed by physical examination 4 months after surgery. The secondary outcome was CPSP incidences at 12 and 24 months. The authors also tested the associations between CPSP and 90 genetic markers plus a series of clinical factors and built a CPSP risk model. Results: Within a median of 4.4 months, CPSP had developed in 527 patients (18.0%), in 13.6% after hernia repair, 11.8% after vaginal hysterectomy, 25.1% after abdominal hysterectomy, and 37.6% after thoracotomy. CPSP persisted after a median of 14.6 months and 26.3 months in 6.2% and 4.1%, respectively, after hernia repair, 4.1% and 2.2% after vaginal hysterectomy, 9.9% and 6.7% after abdominal hysterectomy, and 19.1% and 13.2% after thoracotomy. No significant genetic differences between cases and controls were identified. The risk model included six clinical predictors: (1) surgical procedure, (2) age, (3) physical health (Short Form Health Survey-12), (4) mental health (Short Form Health Survey-12), (5) preoperative pain in the surgical field, and (6) preoperative pain in another area. Discrimination was moderate (c-statistic, 0.731; 95% CI, 0.705 to 0.755). Conclusions: Until unequivocal genetic predictors of CPSP are understood, the authors encourage systematic use of clinical factors for predicting and managing CPSP risk.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1123-1141
    JournalAnesthesiology
    Volume122
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 20 May 2015

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