Fungal bioremediation of agricultural wastewater in a long-term treatment: biomass stabilization by immobilization strategy

Eduardo Beltrán-Flores, Martí Pla-Ferriol, Maira Martínez-Alonso, Núria Gaju, Paqui Blánquez*, Montserrat Sarrà

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Fungal bioremediation emerges as an effective technology for pesticide treatment, but its successful implementation depends on overcoming the problem of microbial contamination. In this regard, fungal immobilization on wood seems to be a promising strategy, but there are two main drawbacks: the predominant removal of pesticides by sorption and fungal detachment. In this study, agricultural wastewater with pesticides was treated by Trametes versicolor immobilized on wood chips in a rotary drum bioreactor (RDB) for 225 days, achieving fungal consolidation and high pesticide biodegradation through two main improvements: the use of a more favorable substrate and the modification of operating conditions. Fungal community dynamic was assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and subsequent prominent band sequencing, showing a quite stable community in the RDB, mainly attributed to the presence of T. versicolor. Pesticide removals were up to 54 % diuron and 48 % bentazon throughout the treatment. Afterwards, pesticide-contaminated wood chips were treated by T. versicolor in a solid biopile-like system. Hence, these results demonstrate that the microbial contamination constraint has definitely been overcome, and fungal bioremediation technology is ready to be implemented on a larger scale.

Original languageEnglish
Article number129614
JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
Volume439
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Oct 2022

Keywords

  • Continuous treatment
  • Pesticides
  • Rotating drum bioreactor
  • Trametes versicolor
  • Wood chips

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