Frustrated expected reward induces differential transcriptional changes in the mouse brain

Elena Martín-García, Noelia Fernández-Castillo, Aurelijus Burokas, Javier Gutiérrez-Cuesta, Cristina Sánchez-Mora, Miguel Casas, Marta Ribasés, Bru Cormand, Rafael Maldonado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction. Frustration represents a particular aspect of the addictive process that is related to loss of control when the expected reward is not obtained. We aim to study the consequences of frustrated expected reward on gene expression in the mouse brain. For this purpose, we used an operant model of frustration using palatable food as reward combined with microarrays. Transcriptomic profiles of frontal cortex, ventral striatum and hippocampus were analysed in five groups of mice: (1) positive control receiving palatable food and the cue light as conditioned stimulus; (2) frustrated group only receiving the cue light; (3) extinction learning group that did not receive palatable food nor the light; (4) negative control that never received the reinforcer nor the light during the whole experiment; and (5) yoked that received palatable food passively. Gene expression changes produced by frustration were revealed in the frontal cortex and ventral striatum, but not in the hippocampus. Most of the changes, such as the modification of the dopamine-DARPP-32 signalling pathway, were common in both areas and estimated to have neuronal origin. Extinction learning induced transcriptional changes only in the ventral striatum, with most genes showing down-regulation and without alteration in the dopamine-DARPP-32 signalling pathway. Active palatable food-seeking behaviour induced changes in gene expression in ventral striatum mainly affecting cell communication. In conclusion, frustration behaviour-induced changes in frontal cortex and ventral striatum mainly related to dopamine-DARPP-32 signalling that could play an important role in the loss of behavioural control during the addictive processes. Frustrated expected reward produced gene expression changes in the frontal cortex and ventral striatum, but not in the hippocampus. Most of the changes, such as the modification of the dopamine-DARPP-32 signalling pathway, were common in both areas and estimated to have neuronal origin. The dopamine-DARPP-32 signalling pathway integrates glutamate and dopamine signals in midbrain dopaminergic neurons affecting fronto-striatal function and plasticity, and it has been related to several behavioural alterations including drug addiction and loss of behavioural control.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-27
JournalAddiction Biology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • DARPP-32
  • frustration
  • gene expression
  • operant behaviour
  • palatable food
  • progressive ratio
  • transcriptomics

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