From Toxic Sites to Parks as (Green) LULUs? New Challenges of Inequity, Privilege, Gentrification, and Exclusion for Urban Environmental Justice

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72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015, © The Author(s) 2015. As marginalized neighborhoods benefit from cleanup and environmental amenities often brought by municipal sustainability planning, recent trends of land revaluation, investments, and gentrification are posing a conundrum and paradox for environmental justice (EJ) activists. In this article, I examine the progression of the urban EJ agenda—from fighting contamination to mobilizing for environmental goods and resisting environmental gentrification—and analyze how the EJ scholarship has reflected upon the complexification of this agenda. I argue that locally unwanted land uses can be reconceptualized from contamination sources to new green amenities because of the displacement they seem to trigger or accelerate.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-36
JournalJournal of Planning Literature
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016

Keywords

  • community development
  • environment
  • environmental gentrification
  • land use
  • LULUs
  • neighborhood greening
  • neighborhood planning
  • recreation and open space
  • sustainability
  • urban environmental justice

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