Export production of coccolithophores in an upwelling region: Results from San Pedro Basin, Southern California Borderlands

Patrizia Ziveri*, Robert C. Thunell, Domenico Rio

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

132 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A seven month-long time series sediment trap project was carried out in San Pedro Basin (Southern California Borderlands) in order to evaluate the response of calcareous nannoplankton to seasonal hydrographic changes. This region is periodically influenced by upwelling, particularly during the spring and early summer. The highest fluxes of both whole coccospheres and individual coccoliths occurred during winter (January-February), a period when the fluxes of diatoms and planktic foraminifera were low. The highest coccolithophore fluxes were recorded in the mid-February with 860 × 106 coccoliths m-2 day-1, 8 × 106 whole coccospheres m-2 day-1, and 80 mg of coccolith carbonate m-2 day-1. Coccolith carbonate fluxes in January and February account for most of the total carbonate fluxes measured during this period. The season of maximum coccolithophore production in this region (winter) is correlated with weak stratification of the upper water column, low total primary production, low nutrient contents, and low temperatures. Emiliania huxleyi and Florisphaera profunda are the two most abundant species in this region. While E. huxleyi displays no distinct seasonal changes in flux, F. profunda shows a clear preference for cold, low nutrient water conditions and low light levels. Helicosphaera spp. flux is positively correlated to the total coccosphere fluxes and is indicative of high coccolithophore productivity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-358
Number of pages24
JournalMarine Micropaleontology
Volume24
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1995

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