Executive summary of management of prosthetic joint infections. Clinical practice guidelines by the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC)

Javier Ariza, Javier Cobo, Josu Baraia-Etxaburu, Natividad Benito, Guillermo Bori, Javier Cabo, Pablo Corona, Jaime Esteban, Juan Pablo Horcajada, Jaime Lora-Tamayo, Oscar Murillo, Julián Palomino, Jorge Parra, Carlos Pigrau, José Luis del Pozo, Melchor Riera, Dolores Rodríguez, Mar Sánchez-Somolinos, Alex Soriano, M. Dolores del ToroBasilio de la Torre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica The incidence of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is expected to increase in the coming years. PJI has serious consequences for patients, and high costs for the health system. The complexity of these infections makes it necessary to organize the vast quantity of information published in the last several years. The indications for the choice of a given surgical strategy and the corresponding antimicrobial therapy are specifically reviewed. The authors selected clinically relevant questions and then reviewed the available literature in order to give recommendations according to a pre-determined level of scientific evidence. The more controversial aspects were debated, and the final composition was agreed at an ad hoc meeting. Before its final publication, the manuscript was made available online in order that all SEIMC members were able to read it and make comments and suggestions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-195
JournalEnfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiologia Clinica
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2017

Keywords

  • Arthroplasty infection
  • Guidelines
  • Prosthetic joint infection

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