Evaluation of different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the diagnosis of brucellosis due to Brucella melitensis in sheep

Ignacio García-Bocanegra, Alberto Allepuz, Julio José Pérez, Anna Alba, Armando Giovannini, Antonio Arenas, Luca Candeloro, Alberto Pacios, José Luís Saez, Miguel Ángel González

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Six serological assays for the diagnosis of ovine brucellosis, due to Brucella melitensis were evaluated. Reference serum samples from sheep of known B. melitensis infection status (n= 118) were assessed using the Rose Bengal test (RBT), complement fixation test (CFT) and four commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), including two indirect ELISAs (iELISAs), one competitive ELISA (cELISA) and one blocking ELISA (bELISA).The highest differential positive rates (DPR) were obtained with the cELISA and bELISA, while the lowest DPR was estimated using iELISAs. A latent class analysis was performed to estimate the accuracy of the CFT, RBT and bELISA using 1827 sera from sheep undergoing testing as part of a surveillance and control programme. Lower sensitivity and specificity were obtained for the three serological tests when the field samples were used. A higher DPR was achieved by the CFT, compared to bELISA and RBT. The results suggest that ELISAs, and particularly the bELISA, might be suitable for inclusion in the European Union legislation on intra-community trade for diagnosing B. melitensis infection in sheep, as it has a similar test performance compared to the RBT. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-445
JournalVeterinary journal
Volume199
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Brucella melitensis
  • Complement fixation test
  • ELISA
  • Latent class analysis
  • Rose Bengal test
  • Sheep

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