ESBL- and plasmidic class C β-lactamase-producing E. coli strains isolated from poultry, pig and rabbit farms

Vanessa Blanc, Raul Mesa, Montserrat Saco, Susana Lavilla, Guillem Prats, Elisenda Miró, Ferran Navarro, Pilar Cortés, Montserrat Llagostera

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121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aims to determine the presence of extended-spectrum (ESBL) and plasmidic class C β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in poultry, pig and rabbit farms of Catalonia (Spain). PFGE typing showed a low clonal relationship among strains carrying these mechanisms of resistance. Ninety-three percent of them were resistant to two or more of the non-β-lactam antimicrobials tested and harboured ESBL and plasmidic class C β-lactamases. Greater diversity of these enzymes was found in strains from poultry farms, the CTX-M-9 family, especially CTX-M-14, with CMY-2 being the most frequent. The isolation of TEM-52 and SHV-2-producing Escherichia coli strains from these animal farms is noteworthy. In contrast, 73% of the strains from pig farms had CTX-M-1, and neither the CMY-type nor CTX-M-9 family enzyme was found. Likewise, it is the first time that CTX-M-1 and SHV-5 encoding strains have been isolated in pigs. On the other hand, in rabbit farms CTX-M-9 family was also the most frequent, being detected in three of a total of four strains. The last one showed a CMY-2, for the first time detected in these animals, too. In conclusion, commensal E. coli strains of food-producing animal farms are a reservoir of ESBL and plasmidic class C β-lactamases. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-304
JournalVeterinary Microbiology
Volume118
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Dec 2006

Keywords

  • ESBL
  • Enterobacteriaceae
  • Escherichia coli
  • Pig and rabbit farms
  • Plasmidic class C
  • Poultry

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