Enduring Changes in Decision Making in Patients with Full Remission from Anorexia Nervosa

Trevor Steward, Gemma Mestre-Bach, Zaida Agüera, Roser Granero, Virginia Martín-Romera, Isabel Sánchez, Nadine Riesco, Iris Tolosa-Sola, Jose A. Fernández-Formoso, Jose C. Fernández-García, Francisco J. Tinahones, Felipe F. Casanueva, Rosa M. Baños, Cristina Botella, Ana B. Crujeiras, Rafael de la Torre, Jose M. Fernández-Real, Gema Frühbeck, Francisco J. Ortega, Amaia RodríguezSusana Jiménez-Murcia, Jose M. Menchón, Fernando Fernández-Aranda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Background: Deficits in neuropsychological functioning have consistently been identified in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). However, little is known on how decision making in AN patients evolves in response to treatment or whether impairments are reversible. Method: AN patients (n = 42) completed the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) upon admission to a 3-month day-hospital treatment programme and at a 1-year follow-up. Patient IGT performance was compared to age-matched controls (n = 46). Results: AN patients displayed poorer performance on the IGT at admission compared to controls (p <.001). Patients with full remission (n = 31; 73.9%) at the 1-year follow-up improved IGT performance (p = 0.007), and scores were similar compared to controls (p = 0.557). AN patients with partial/no remission at follow-up (n = 11; 26.1%) did not improve IGT scores (p = 0.867). Conclusions: These findings uphold that enduring remission from AN can reverse decision-making impairments, and they might be most likely explained by clinical state rather than a trait vulnerability. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)523-527
JournalEuropean Eating Disorders Review
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2016

Keywords

  • choice behaviour
  • cognitive behavioural therapy
  • cognitive impairments
  • eating and feeding disorders
  • longitudinal studies
  • neuropsychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Enduring Changes in Decision Making in Patients with Full Remission from Anorexia Nervosa'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this