Effects of various fat sources, α-tocopheryl acetate, and ascorbic acid supplements on fatty acid composition and α-tocopherol content in raw and vacuum-packed, cooked dark chicken meat

R. Bou, S. Grimpa, F. Guardiola, A. C. Barroeta, R. Codony

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A factorial design was used to study the effects of dietary fat sources (beef tallow, fresh and oxidized sunflower oils, and linseed oil), α-tocopheryl acetate (0 and 225 mg/kg), and ascorbic acid (0 and 110 mg/kg) supplementation on fatty acid composition, as well as on fat and α-tocopherol content in vacuum-packed raw and cooked meat stored at -20°C. Raw meat fatty acid composition was affected by dietary fat sources and tocopheryl acetate supplementation. After cooking, meat composition was only affected by dietary fat sources. Birds fed linseed oil yielded meat rich in n-3 fatty acids, especially linolenic acid, which provides about 20% of the adequate intake for this fatty acid. Birds fed sunflower or oxidized sunflower oil produced meat rich in n-6 fatty acids, whereas those fed beef tallow resulted in meat rich in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Raw and cooked dark chicken meat α-tocopherol content was only affected by tocopherol supplementation. Supplementation with α-tocopheryl acetate led to α-tocopherol-enriched meat, which provides about 25% of the recommended dietary allowance. Moreover, this content in vacuum-packed samples was not modified even after 7 mo of storage at -20°C. ©2006 Poultry Science Association Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1472-1481
JournalPoultry Science
Volume85
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2006

Keywords

  • Ascorbic acid supplementation
  • Chicken meat
  • Fat source
  • Nutritional value
  • Tocopheryl acetate supplementation

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