Effects of prenatal diazepam on two-way avoidance behavior, swimming navigation and brain levels of benzodiazepine-like molecules in male roman high- and low-avoidance rats

P. Driscoll, P. Ferré, A. Fernández-Teruel, A. Tobeña, R. M. Escorihuela, M. Levi de Stein, C. Wolfman, J. Medina

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    Abstract

    Utilizing psychogenetically selected Roman high- and low-avoidance rats (RHA/Verh and RLA/Verh), the present experiments investigated the effects of prenatally administered vehicle and diazepam (1 and 3 mg/kg per day, SC) on the behavior and neurochemistry of adult, male offspring. Active, two-way avoidance behavior was analyzed in 96 rats, at 6 months of age, and swimming navigation in 68 others, at 11 months. Three weeks after testing, selected brain areas from the latter animals were immunoassayed for benzodiazepine (BZD)-like molecules. The 3 mg/kg dose of diazepam both decreased freezing behavior in the shuttle box and reduced the hippocampal content of BZD-like molecules in the RLA/Verh male rats. Swimming navigation (spatial learning), at which the RLA/Verh rats were more adept, was not specifically affected by prenatal diazepam in either rat line. The possibility exists that an increased hippocampal release of BZD-like substances may be necessary to alter shuttle box behavior in RLA/Verh rats. © 1995 Springer-Verlag.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)51-57
    JournalPsychopharmacology
    Volume122
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 1995

    Keywords

    • Benzodiazepine-like molecules
    • Diazepam
    • Genetic selection
    • Roman high- and low-avoidance rats
    • Swimming navigation
    • Two-way, active avoidance

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