Effect of soil bacteria on the ability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) removal by Trametes versicolor and Irpex lacteus from contaminated soil

Eduard Borràs, Gloria Caminal, Montserrat Sarrà, Čenek Novotný

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    Abstract

    The effect of bacteria represented by indigenous soil microflora or a mixture of soil bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Rhodococcus erythropolis on fungal growth, extracellular enzyme production and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) biodegradation efficiency in soil of white-rot fungi Trametes versicolor and Irpex lacteus was investigated. Both fungi were able to colonize soil. The growth yields measured by ergosterol were about two-fold in I. lacteus after 10 weeks. Laccase was produced in T. versicolor cultures in the presence or absence of bacteria but live bacteria reduced the laccase levels in soil about 5 times. Manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) was not detected in T. versicolor cultures. The amounts of MnP and laccase in I. lacteus cultures were not affected by the presence of bacteria. T. versicolor was more efficient in PAH removal for all PAHs tested although its capacity to colonize soil was lower. The removal rates of PAHs by T. versicolor in sterile soil were 1.5-fold, 5.8-fold and 1.8-fold for 2-3-ring, 4-ring and 5-6-ring PAHs, compared to I. lacteus, respectively. I. lacteus showed a low efficiency of removal of pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene and benzo[k]fluoranthene, compared to T. versicolor, whereas chrysene and benzo[b]fluoranthene were degraded by neither fungus. The main effect of the presence of the indigenous microflora or R. erythropolis and P. aeruginosa was a significant decrease of degradation of total PAHs by both T. versicolor and I. lacteus. Weak fungal/bacterial synergistic effects were observed in the case of removal of acenapthylene, benzo[a]pyrene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene and benzo[g,h,i]perylene by I. lacteus and acenapthylene by T. versicolor. However, the bacterial effects were different in the two fungi. PAH abiotic losses represented 15 and 21% of the total PAHs after 5 and 10 weeks, respectively; naphthalene and acenaphthene were removed from the soil due to volatilization. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2087-2093
    JournalSoil Biology and Biochemistry
    Volume42
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2010

    Keywords

    • Bioremediation
    • Creosote
    • PAH
    • Soil bacteria
    • White-rot fungi

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