Effect of dietary fat sources and zinc and selenium supplements on the composition and consumer acceptability of chicken meat

R. Bou, F. Guardiola, A. C. Barroeta, R. Codony

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A factorial design was used to study the effect of changes in broiler feed on the composition and consumer acceptability of chicken meat. One week before slaughter, 1.25% dietary fish oil was removed from the feed and replaced by other fat sources (animal fat or linseed oil) or we continued with fish oil, and diets were supplemented with Zn (0, 300, or 600 mg/kg), and Se (0 or 1.2 mg/kg as sodium selenite or 0.2 mg/kg as Se-enriched yeast). The changes in dietary fat led to distinct fatty acid compositions of mixed raw dark and white chicken meat with skin. The fish oil diet produced meat with the highest eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) content, whereas the linseed oil diet led to meat with the highest content in total n-3 polyunsaturated acids (PUFA), especially linolenic acid. However, meat from animals on the animal fat diet was still rich in very long-chain n-3 PUFA. Se content was affected by Se and Zn supplements. Se content increased with Zn supplementation. However, only Se from the organic source led to a significant increase in this mineral in meat compared with the control. Consumer acceptability scores and TBA values of cooked dark chicken meat after 74 d or after 18 mo of frozen storage were not affected by any of the dietary factors studied. ©2005 Poultry Science Association, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1129-1140
JournalPoultry Science
Volume84
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2005

Keywords

  • Chicken meat composition
  • Consumer acceptability
  • Fat source
  • Selenium supplementation
  • Zinc supplementation

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