Early experience with the use of an interlocking nail for the repair of canine femoral shaft fractures

I. Durall, M. C. Diaz

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    49 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Static locked nailing was used to repair fractures of the femoral diaphysis in 15 dogs. The implant consists of a 5, 6, or 7 mm diameter stainless steel rod made up of two parts: the body of the nail, in which there are 13 threaded holes, and a piece without holes that contains a slot for anchoring the jig. Good limb function was obtained after less than 3 weeks in 12 dogs and these dogs remained sound throughout the study. Radiographic examination revealed fracture healing in 11 of the dogs, between 8 and 16 weeks after surgery. One dog was not returned for follow-up evaluation until 22 weeks after surgery; complete healing was apparent from radiographic examination. The remaining three dogs had to have additional operations, one because of lameness caused by excessive length of the distal screws, one because of a nonunion, and the third because of a sequestrum. Fracture healing in these dogs was observed at 18, 21, and 24 weeks respectively. Loosening of one screw and angulation of the bone occurred in one dog. These complications had no adverse effects on clinical outcome. ©Copyright 1996 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)397-406
    JournalVeterinary Surgery
    Volume25
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1996

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