Do different circadian typology measures modulate their relationship with personality? A test using the Alternative Five Factor Model

Christoph Randler, Montserrat Gomà-I-Freixanet, Anna Muro, Christina Knauber, Ana Adan

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2014 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc. The relationship between personality and circadian typology shows some inconsistent results and it has been hypothesized that the model used to measure personality might have a moderating effect on this relationship. However, it has never been explored if this inconsistency was dependent on the questionnaire used to measure differences in circadian rhythms as well. We explored this issue in a sample of 564 university students (32% men; 19-40 years) using the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire, which is based on an evolutionary-biological approach, in combination with the Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM) and the reduced Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (rMEQ). Both questionnaires detected differences between circadian typologies in Sociability (highest in evening types; ET) and Impulsive Sensation-Seeking scales (highest in ET), while the CSM also detected differences in Activity (lowest in ET) and Aggression-Hostility (highest in ET). Further, both questionnaires detected differences between circadian typologies in the subscales General Activity (morning types [MT] higher than ET), Impulsivity (ET highest) and Sensation-Seeking (highest in ET). Differences between circadian typologies/groups in the subscales Parties (highest in ET) and Isolation Intolerance (lowest in MT) were only detected by the rMEQ. The CSM clearly separated evening types from neither and morning types while the rMEQ showed that neither types are not intermediate but closer to evening types in General Activity and Isolation Intolerance, and closer to morning types in Impulsive Sensation-Seeking, Parties, Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking. The obtained results indicate that the relationship between circadian typology and personality may be dependent on the instrument used to assess circadian typology. This fact may help to explain some of the conflicting data available on the relationship between these two concepts.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)281-288
JournalChronobiology International
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • Circadian typology
  • Composite scale of morningness
  • Personality
  • Reduced morningness-eveningness questionnaire
  • Sex
  • ZKPQ

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