DNA-proportional distribution of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization painting of all chromosomes of a human female karyotype

Joan Francesc Barquinero Estruch, J.F. Barquinero, S. Knehr, H. Braselmann, M. Figel, M. Bauchinger

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Abstract

Purpose: This is the extension of a previous study, showing deviations from a DNA-proportional involvement of 12 single chromosomes (1-4, 6-10, 12, 14 and X) in radiation-induced translocations and dicentrics measured by FISH-painting and classified by standard cytogenetic scoring criteria. By adding data on chromosomes 2, 4, 5, 9, 11-13, 15-22 and X the analysis now comprises all chromosomes of a human female karyotype evaluated with three nomenclature systems (PAINT, S and S and a conventional method). Material and methods: Metaphase spreads were prepared from lymphocytes irradiated with 3 Gy 220 kV X-rays. FISH painting was performed with single chromosome-specific probes in combination with a pancentromeric probe. Results: Deviations from a DNA-proportional distribution became apparent for all aberration parameters analysed with the three nomenclature systems. Chromosomes 2, 3 and 6 were less frequently involved and chromosomes 16, 17 and 20 were more frequently involved in exchange aberrations. Generally, smaller chromosomes (15-22, with the exception of chromosome 19) were more frequently involved in aberration formation than expected. Conclusion: The assumption that the probability of a chromosome being involved in an exchange aberration is proportional to its DNA content is not supported by the present data.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)315-323
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Biology
Volume74
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 8 Sep 1998

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