Disorder of the personality: A possible factor of risk for the dementia

Josep Deví Bastida, Janina Genescà Pujol, Sandra Valle Vives, Susanna Jofre Font, Albert Fetscher Eickhoff, Enric Arroyo Cardona

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

© 2019 STM Editores S.A. All rights reserved. Objectives. The fact that more and more people suffer from dementia makes it very important to know the different risk factors to prevent their appearance. The objective of this article is to study personality disorder as a possible risk factor for the onset of an insane process, and to relate personality disorders of Cluster B and dementia. Methodology. A systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out with scientific literature published up to 2015. Results. Twelve of the articles that we found met the specified criteria of selection and quality and study the relationship between a personality disorder and the emergence of a dementia. Although with the studies made so far it can't be concluded that the first one is a risk factor for the second one, it has been noted, thanks to neuroimaging techniques, that patients with Cluster B personality disorders develop alterations in brain structures (in the prefrontal, temporal and parietal cortex, as well as an alteration in the NAA levels and the grey matter levels) and which are also involved in a demented process. Conclusions. Definitely, the patients with medical record of the borderline or narcissistic personality disorder present more alterations in the brain structures mentioned, such that presenting these types of personality disorders could increase the risk of developing dementia in the future.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-69
JournalActas Espanolas de Psiquiatria
Volume47
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Meta-analysis
  • Odds Ratio
  • Personality disorder

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