Diets high in corn oil or extra-virgin olive oil provided from weaning advance sexual maturation and differentially modify susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis in female rats

Raquel Moral, Raquel Escrich, Montserrat Solanas, Elena Vela, Irmgard Costa, M. Carme Ruiz De Villa, Eduard Escrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on the importance of early-life events in breast cancer risk, we have investigated the effects of high-fat diets on maturation, mammary gland development, and its susceptibility to transformation. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a lowfat (LF), high corn oil (HCO), or high extra-virgin olive oil (HOO) diet from weaning and gavaged with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene. Body weight and mass increased in the HCO group compared to the LF group. The vaginal opening was advanced in both high-fat groups, especially in the HCO group. This HCO group also had increased body weight around puberty, more corpora lutea at post-puberty, and tended to have higher kisspeptin levels in the hypothalamus. Both high-fat diets induced subtle modifications in the morphology of the mammary gland, with no changes on β-casein or hormone receptors expression in the gland. The HCO diet had a clearly stimulating effect of carcinogenesis, inducing the earliest appearance of tumors and the highest tumor incidence and yield, whereas the HOO diet seemed to have a weak enhancing effect, increasing tumor yield. Our data suggest a strong influence of the HCO diet in sexual maturation and mammary cancer risk, while rats fed the HOO diet were more similar to the controls. Copyright © 2011, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-420
JournalNutrition and Cancer
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2011

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