Dental shape variability in cercopithecoid primates: A model for the taxonomic attribution of macaques from roman archaeological contexts

Mónica Nova Delgado, Beatriz Gamarra, Jordi Nadal, Oriol Mercadal, Oriol Olesti, Jordi Guàrdia, Alejandro Pérez-Pérez, Jordi Galbany

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel. Morphometric variation of biological structures has been widely used to determine taxonomic affinities among taxa, and teeth are especially informative for both deep phylogenetic relationships and specific ecological signals. We report 2-dimensional geometric morphometrics (GM) analyses of occlusal crown surfaces of lower molars (M<inf>1</inf>, n = 141; M<inf>2</inf>, n = 158) of cercopithecoid primate species. A 12-landmark configuration, including cusp tips and 8 points of the molar crown contour, were used to evaluate patterns of variation in lower molar shape among cercopithecoid primates and to predict the taxonomic attribution of 2 archaeological macaques from Roman time periods. The results showed that the lower molar shape of cercopithecoid primates reflects taxonomic affinities, mostly at a subfamily level and close to a tribe level. Thus, the cusp positions and crown contour were important elements of the pattern related to interspecific variation. Additionally, the archaeological specimens, attributed to Macaca sylvanus based on osteological information, were classified using the GM molar shape variability of the cercopithecoid primates studied. The results suggest that their molar shape resembled both M. sylvanus and M. nemestrina, and species attribution varied depending on the comparative sample used.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)361-378
JournalFolia Primatologica
Volume85
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Cercopithecoid primates
  • Geometric morphometrics
  • Macaca
  • Molar shape
  • Procrustes superimposition
  • Taxonomy
  • Teeth

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